Landlords say they would lower rents to help tenants

The National Association of Independent Landlords in Los Angeles has declared landlords would be  happy to aid tenants pay the rent in times of recession.

Landlords would be ready to lower rents

According to an informal online survey, nearly one-third of the landlords (32%) have already lowered rents over the past 18 months, and two-thirds of them declare they would have no problem at all in lowering rents to help their tenants.

The National Association of Independent Landlords in the US is the country’s largest provider of services for small landlords. They made an online survey to a selection of  landlords to find out their way of action to confront recession times.

Tracey Benson, president of this association, points out that in today’s tough economy, renters absolutely should approach their landlords if they need help making ends meet. Benson said renters and landlords have much to gain by working together. If renters can’t pay all of their rent, they usually don’t pay anything at all–hoping the problem will just go away–but that strategy of avoidance just compounds their troubles, hurts their credit rating and adds to their stress level. Landlords today understand what’s going on. They don’t want an empty home any more than a renter wants to be asked to leave.

Of those landlords willing to negotiate, 61% said they would drop rents up to 5%, and another 29% said they would take off up to 10%; the handful of those remaining said they would consider even steeper discounts.

For further information, please visit www.landlordassociation.com or call 1-800.352.3395.

Source: PRWEB at http://www.prweb.com

Discussion2 Comments

  1. Thats a very welcome move in the UK where I am based landlords have been lowering their rentals for the past 24months. I am a landlord and have been doing the same in line with my clients’ needs. This has helped me reduce my voids. However, you always get the occassional tenant who wants to take advantage by not paying even if they have the means to do so. The best approach would be to approach the landlord and discuss a workable payment arrangement that suits both parties. We also provide services for vulnerable groups so our services are more geared towards accommodating people’s needs. visit us on http://www.chilternsupport.com

  2. Too bad I didn’t live in Los Angeles when the recession got really bad.

    I specifically asked the manager at my apartment where I lived for 14 years if she would be willing to lower the rent so that me and my daughter could stay.

    with no hesitation, NO! I tried to point out the math, but that didn’t matter. She said that they would wait for someone to pay the full amount. My neighbor also asked and was told no.

    They are still charging the same as when I was there and they seem to have a lot of vacancies.

    Greedy! It’s in Livermore, California and it has no central air and grows mold.
    You will know you are there as soon as you walk in. They are old and it;s crazy that they can charge that much. Our town makes some housing affordable when they allow new homes to be built, but we have no rent control and I suggested that apartments be appraised much in the way that homes are, and was told that was not going to happen.

    I was pretty much born and raised here and it’s disappointing that our city would not make it beter for low income people to liver her and raise the next generation.

    SAD

    Go figure.

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